Posted 1 year ago
At a press conference Tuesday NFL commissioner Roger Goodell left no doubts about where the league stands on Wi-Fi in stadiums: He wants league-wide networks in every NFL venue, so that fans “don’t have to shut down” their mobile devices.
Posted 2 years ago
staff:

Sharing your posts on Facebook just got a billion times better, with integration into Facebook’s Timeline, News Feed, and Ticker.
New options include:
Toggle “Send to Facebook” when posting.
Share Replies on your Facebook Timeline.
Share Likes on your Facebook Timeline.(They even get lumped together so they’re not overwhelming!)
You can find the new options in your blog settings. If your blog is already connected to Facebook, you’ll be automatically prompted to upgrade.

very cool guys—nice work!

staff:

Sharing your posts on Facebook just got a billion times better, with integration into Facebook’s Timeline, News Feed, and Ticker.

New options include:

  • Toggle “Send to Facebook” when posting.
  • Share Replies on your Facebook Timeline.
  • Share Likes on your Facebook Timeline.
    (They even get lumped together so they’re not overwhelming!)

You can find the new options in your blog settings. If your blog is already connected to Facebook, you’ll be automatically prompted to upgrade.

very cool guys—nice work!

Posted 2 years ago

chrispetescia:

GPOY…Monday: 

Carrot Creative featured in AdWeek today :) 

Thanks to Katy for the scan!

so awesome.

Posted 2 years ago
Do not go into advertising. Your creativity, as trite as it sounds, is worth more than that corporation will ever pay you. We all need jobs. There is nothing wrong with doing something that is not your dream job, out of necessity. But it doesn’t have to be advertising. If you are young, you have time to try a lot of things. Try to be a writer. Try to make it with your band. Try to be a working artist. If it doesn’t work out financially, at least you gave it a shot. And you never have to stop making art, regardless of your circumstances. Unless you agree to sell your creativity to that machine.

Do Not Go Into Advertising

I know this was like a week old, but it still irks me, and I think there’s one more thing to say about it. 

This is, of course, me. I was in a band. I had a record label. I was a photographer. I wrote fiction. And I went into advertising. For… almost fifteen years. I am still, in many ways, “in advertising.” I sit on the bord of a prestigious ad school. I work with tech starts who predominantly make their money off of advertising, and I advise them on advertising. I am writing a book about advertising. 

But you know what else I am doing? Making art. Art that I love. That I do not give a fuck if anyone, ever, buys. And I don’t need to make a living off of it. I am working on two novels. I am working on a photo book of blurry photographs taken from Amtrak trains along the northeast corridor. I love my photos, and I consider them art. I will also be shocked if I ever sell more than 50 books of them. But I do not care. Because I don’t need to make a living off of them. 

Art and commerce are implicitly combined in this author’s trolling post. Implicit is that advertising is commerce, and you should try and “make it’ as a writer, or as an artist, rather than deign to be part of commerce. So what does “making it” mean? It means making money. It means commerce. 

My art, thanks to my career in advertising, is now completely divorced of commerce, because I chose to make a living in something I happened to be really good at instead of something I was not actually all that “good” at, in terms of making a career. 

So, now. Whose art is more pure? The artist who has the luxury, thanks to hard work, to create their art without a concern for commerce, or the artist who still has to cater their art to the “market” and make a living off of it? 

And no, you don’t have to “stop making art…. unless you agree to sell your creativity to that machine.” What utter bollucks. 

Did you know that there was a novel called The Man Nobody Knows that was a modern-day biography of Jesus Christ that was the best selling novel in the United States for two full years in a row? Do you know who wrote it? Bruce Barton, one of the Bs in BBDO.

You probably DID know about Rushdie, Fay Weldon, Len Deighton, Peter Carey, Sir Alan Parker, Sir Ridley Scott, David Fincher, Spike Jonze, and Michel Gondry, however. Ad men, every one of them. 

(props to Mark Tungate for this info. His book AdLand: A Global History of Advertising is worthy reading). 

Closer to home, the number of people in AWESOME but noncommercial bands I know in advertising is insane. And just last week I was grabbing drinks with a friend who had published THREE books, and stated he’s MUCH happier at his agency job. 

Gah. I’m annoyed this trolling even worked on me. 

(via rickwebb)

Posted 2 years ago

Here’s how Tumblr could make $100M per year if they tried

caterpillarcowboy:

I believe e-commerce can make Tumblr over $100M a year. I’ve shared my thoughts with the Tumblr team directly, but I figured I’d share it with all of you as well. It comes in two flavors: independent stores (bottom up) and retail partnerships (top down). 

Independent stores are like Etsy, but not limited to handmade - Tumblr users can sell what they craft, draw, photograph, and compose directly to their followers. Tumblr facilitates the transaction via credit card or Paypal, taking a modest 5% transaction fee. Not only does this generate meaningful revenue, it creates a really amazing virtuous cycle for user growth: sellers promote their tumblogs offline to drive business, which drives more users registrations, which create more sellers, who then promote their shops, etc. At least, that’s what we saw at Etsy. At last estimate, Etsy did ~$3M/month in revenue, an easily attainable goal for Tumblr. The integration is non-instrusive: Tumblr users can choose to add a “Purchase” button to the bottom of their post that is tied to an item they’ve added to their tumblr shop (also viewable at user.tumblr.com/store). Followers who click the button input their billing & shipping info via an overlay to purchase, then are returned right to where they were in the dashboard. Like at Etsy & Ebay, Tumblr processes the payments but otherwise leaves transaction coordination to the buyer & seller. Down the road, Tumblr could aggregate all of these items together into a Tumblr Marketplace, for people who want to exclusively browse the items for sale by all Tumblr users.

Retail partnerships would work like this: Tumblr does custom integrations with the major retailers (Barneys, Nordstrom, Gilt) so that every time a post containing a link to a partner’s product page is detected, a “Purchase” button is embedded at the bottom of the post. Clicking the button leads the user through a purchase pipeline. Tumblr gets a 5-15% affiliate fee. I believe Tumblr can negotiate very aggressive revshare deals because of the volume, the incremental revenue, and the demographic. The reason why nobody can do this except Tumblr is because Tumblr’s users are curators, and curators are the missing component. Amazon is great at selling books but is awful at softlines (retail speak for fashion items) because there are so many items and they go out of style every 3 months. (Read my post for more detail.) Tumblr’s community of curators is the secret ingredient that I believe can bring e-commerce’s current single digit share of the $225 Billion US fashion market into the double digits.

Here’s the math: Tumblr claims 60M posts per day or 22B per year. If we assume 0.1% of posts fall into the e-commerce category, each post gets viewed by 200 followers, 1% of those followers buy something, and Tumblr makes a $2.40 transaction fee per sale (8% on $30 item), that’s $105 Million per year.

Given a small team with the right skills, Tumblr could get this going in 3-6 months. The $100M question is, why aren’t they already doing this?

Great thoughts from Dave on what I consider one of the five key revenue drivers Tumblr should test in 2012.

Posted 2 years ago

carrotcreative:

Skyping with the @carrotuae team in Dubai!

Love you guys :)

Posted 2 years ago
It is very difficult to make good mistakes
Goro Shimura
Posted 3 years ago
Posted 3 years ago
The myth of user-generated content. “Those who create are rare; those who cannot are numerous. Therefore, the latter are stronger.” A lot of social media sites assume that a lot of their users will be heavy contributors. They then proceed to design a product geared only toward heavy contributors. This is wrong-headed. Less than 0.5% of a site’s users (often FAR less than) are heavy contributors.

If Chanel Were a Product Designer | Hugo Liu’s Taste Blog (via likesandlaunch)

good point!!  the one exception of course is the curator clause.

Posted 3 years ago

anyclip:

The Hollywood Reporter breaks the exciting news of a deal between AnyClip and Universal Studios. Check the article out here.

This is huge!  Congrats to the anyclip team.

(Source: anyclip)